Your Questions

Answers To Some Of The Most Frequently Questioned Topics

How did I get into photography in the first place? Why and what motivates me to take pictures? Have I got plans for new projects? What’s on my bucket list of travel destinations? These and many other questions will hopefully be answered on the following page.

 

 

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When did you get started with photography?

As a kid – mum’s old Kodak Instamatic got me interested at the age of 8. Later I bugged her for an Olympus OM10 for my 16th birthday. At that time I was more interested in technical subjects such as cars, locomotives and airshows, landscape was something that was always there, taken for granted and rarely photographed. Looking back I regret not taking more interest.

What equipment do you use?

Currently I am shooting with a Nikon D800, a 36 Mega-pixel camera using a full format sensor. I also have a Nikon D700 for backup and timelapse purposes. I use Nikkor lenses with focal lengths covering everything from 14-400mm.

How important is photography to you?

It’s an addiction. I see the world through a viewfinder and feel naked when I leave my camera at home, worried that I might miss something special. Nature is my refuge and combining my love for the outdoors with my passion for photography is the perfect combo for me. It’s a perfect way to enjoy my spare time freeing me from all those daily chores and problems.

Your favourite and most inspiring location?

That is a very difficult question. I wouldn’t say that I have one special location but many. It is a dilemma because all of the places I have visited I would love to return to again and again but there are also new travel destinations on my bucket list and that is as long as my arm. Iceland is a definite favourite due to the remoteness and ever changing weather and scenery. The US is also a place that really fascinates me with so much diversity I could travel there indefinitely.

Your favourite photographer past or present?

There are so many wonderful and inspiring photographers. But the two that stick out in my mind are Moose Peterson and Marc Adamus, two very professional guys that devote their whole lives to the art of landscape and wildlife photography.

What are your future plans photographically speaking?

To keep shooting and develop my style further. I would like to travel to New Zealand next year, which has been on my
bucket list for quite a while now. I would like to devote all of my time to travel photography but as soon as my existance depends on earning money from it then I am worried that the enjoyment factor could be destroyed. Having said that, I still enjoy my day job creating pictures for advertising. In the future I would like to do an exhibition of my work, sell Fine Art limited editions and maybe even write a book. Let’s see.

What advice would you give to a budding young photographer?

Get out there and practice, practice, practice. Cameras don’t make good photographers, unfortunately many think this is so. A good camera and lens is just the start but training the eye to see things that others don’t is a life long task. Being in the right place at the right time, judging weather conditions, good planning etc. All these things come with experience over the years. Photography can be a lonely job involving a lot of personal sacrifice, it can become an obsession. I too, although only a hobbyist wonder why I get so involved in what I do, well, it has to do with passion and getting that perfect shot where everything comes together at once.

May I use your photos for my blog or a school project?

I get regular requests asking for permission to use my images for various reasons. Please note first and foremost that all the images on this site are copyright protected and may not be used for commercial or personal use without prior permission. If you want to share a photo on your personal blog or website that is fine, just make sure to credit the work properly. If you’d like to use an image for any other reason please inquire here.

How much of a role does technology play in your everyday life?

I am often confronted with questions about sensor sizes, tech spec of equipment and also to the shooting data of my pictures. As soon as I say that I make pictures and don’t test or sell equipment for a particular manufacturer this usually kills the conversation before it starts. Of course without good equipment the “Technical” quality of a picture isn’t ensured and over the years you realize that buying better quality lenses for example is a necessity to ensure your own growing quality assurance. Generally though I find good light and composition a lot more important than noise levels and sharpness. What’s the use of a technically perfect shot if the exposure, composition or suspense is missing? Those who like to discuss new product releases and updates to software are generally those looking for the perfect camera that will make the perfect picture for them, but what’s the point of that and of course, where is the fun factor? Thank God that this is still left to the ability of the photographer.

What kind of Post Processing workflow do you use?

This is quite a complex question to answer and for this reason I will be writing a tutorial to this end in the near future. In brief though I do try to get the picture on site, in camera as good as I can to minimize the effort needed in the digital darkroom afterwards. This is not always possible with distracting details in the pictures or sensor dust spots and contrast lacking pictures just to name a few of the visually unpleasing instances. To cut the story short I use DXO Optics Pro for the RAW conversion and am getting gradually more into Lightroom again. Once converted I use Photoshop CC for the finishing touches, especially for the “handwork” retouching issues. I also use Nik filters now and again to add grain or a particular look etc.

Is there a negative attribute to travel photography?

Weight! The biggest pain in the butt is having to carry a fully loaded rucksack of around 7-8kg with you the whole day especially without the use of a car. The biggest hassle is carrying a tripod in addition, they are cumbersome and with a good head still too heavy. I find it is often a difficult decision to take one with me but without it you will almost always miss good opportunities especially in the evening or by long exposures. It does happen though that you take it with you and don’t use it at all. C’est la Vie!

If you had a wish granted regarding your hobby what would that be?

Time & money. Having a full-time job requires spending a lot of time not doing that what one would like to do most that’s something we all have to live with. Travelling requires good organization and funding. Photography takes up most of my spare time, if I’m not out somewhere on a shoot then I am in front of the computer sorting, processing material, archiving and developing the website further with articles and imagery.

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