Camera Gear

A Rundown Of The Camera Equipment I Use

I am by no means a technology freak, on the contrary I can think of a more comfortable way of travelling without having to lug a rucksack full of lenses, camera bodies, a laptop, plus tripod and all the other bits and pieces that one needs to produce professional results but unfortunately “the” camera that could replace this heavy burden has yet to be invented. But then it would be much too easy then wouldn’t it?

 

 

Equipment List

I have been using Nikon Digital gear for some years now and I wouldn’t want to change a running system although now & again I  do find that other systems from Canon, Olympus, Sony and Leica have some very innovative ideas. In my opinion though at the end of the day the image quality has more to do with the image content and the photographers visual fantasy than a specific make of camera kit.

Nikon D800

The best camera I  have ever had and I hope to get many a good picture from this baby yet. As I bought the D800 I at last had the feeling of using the nearest thing to the “Perfect” piece of kit. All the spec that a photographer needs plus video, who needs more? All the more amazing was the price for this FX 36Mp monster, just €2500, a real bargain when you consider how expensive a mid format camera costs. Of course since then Nikon has brought out some newer cameras but the D800 remains in the top 10 best cameras by DXO Benchmark.

Nikon D700

The D700 has become my backup camera although with just 12MP it just cannot replace the quality & resolution of the D800. Nowadays I take the D700 only on foreign trips in case the D800 ceases to work or for shooting the odd timelapse film. The next step will be to use the D800 as my next generation backup as soon as a worthwhile alternative to the D800 as primary solution is available.

Nikon 14-24mm f/2,8

I used to use a Tokina 12-24mm and although quite a good lens for the price it had its limits especially in the corners of the frames where it became very blurry and extensive Chromatic Aberrations. The Nikon 14-24mm is still considered to be one of Nikons best ever lenses and I can only agree on this point. Sharp as hell and very little CA issues. Only negative point is the problem with using filters. Due to its huge diameter it is a costly issue to find filters and filter holders for this lens. There are a number of solutions to the problem but none of them are cheap.

Nikon 24-70mm F/2,8

This is my general purpose lens. The range from a not so wide wideangle to a little more than the standard 50mm gives me a certain amount of flexibility with a good performance in bad light conditions with a nice Bokeh at f/2,8 to boot.  I like using this lens for shooting panoramas, landscapes and skies. Due to its compact size it is a good lens for candid shots practically anywhere. I couldn’t and wouldn’t want to do without this piece of kit.

Nikon 80-400mm f/5,6

I had to wait a long time for this lens, not because of the price but due to Nikon taking so long to update the previous model known for its very slow and loud AF, not to mention some issues with sharpness and aberrations. This lens came onto the market at almost double the price but is worth every cent. It is compact, has a fast AF and produces optically stunning results. The bokeh doesn’t match that of its big brother the 200-400mm f/4 but with its size, weight and triple price tag I’m can live with this disadvantage. I can highly recommend this piece of glass especially for travel  photographers like myself.

Nikon 105mm AFS/VR Micro Nikkor f/2,8

I love my macro lens! There are probably better and faster macro lenses on the market presently but this baby is as snug as a bug in a rug for my purposes. The AF is quick and quiet making shots of insects a little easier. I use this lens often for product photography indoors and for shooting fine details of anything this lens is indispensable. The bokeh at f/2,8 is very nice too.

Nikon SB900-AF Speedlight

I am by no means a professional flash photographer but when it comes to off camera flash for my product photography this piece of kit does just the job and more besides. This is a piece of kit that I rarely take out with me as obviously for landscape work it is pretty useless but for the odd portrait and macro work indoors I like to use the flash as fill in light often.

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Did You Know?

The scientists who made DSLRs possible back in the late 1960s – Willard S Boyle and George E Smith were awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2009. Kodak launched the first commercial DSLR in 1991. By the turn of the millennium, rapid advances in technology had significantly reduced their cost. Kodak, meanwhile, stopped making digital cameras in 2012 after filing for bankruptcy.

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